European Green Capital

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Do you know what European Green Capital is?

It is a ward which is provided for the ideal city for energy and natural sustainability !

For 2015, it is awarded to Bristol city here in Britain!

Luckily, the author for this Blog live there !? Wow!

ヨーロッパグリーンキャピタルに関するお話です!

ヨーロッパグリーンキャピタルは毎年、環境や自然に考慮した持続可能なエネルギー活動が行われている

都市がえらばれます。

2015年はなんとイギリスのブリストル市が選ばれました!

 

Bristol is a city with one foot in the countryside. Acres of hilly allotments slope into wildlife corridors and riverside cycle paths.

It’s big on slow food, urban farmers’ markets, city farms and free-range thinking.

And now, thanks to all this grassroots greenery, Bristol is the first UK city to be named a European Green Capital since the awards began in 2010. The year-long eco-fest begins on 24 January.

Bristol is a city with one foot in the countryside. Acres of hilly allotments slope into wildlife corridors and riverside cycle paths. It’s big on slow food, urban farmers’ markets, city farms and free-range thinking (think street art, independent shops, an independent mayor, and a local currency – the Bristol Pound is now widely accepted). The BBC’s Natural History Unit is based here; so is transport charity Sustrans and the ethical Triodos Bank. And now, thanks to all this grassroots greenery, Bristol is the first UK city to be named a European Green Capital since the awards began in 2010. The year-long eco-fest begins on 24 January.

 

Bristol offers a variety of terrain for cyclists, urban and rural.

 

Hire a bike from Cycle the City and pedal around Bristol’s hilly but bike-friendly streets. It’s a hub of national cycle routes: a good off-road route follows the disused railway line – part of Sustrans’ route 41 – which runs through the Avon Gorge. Though marred by the three-lane Portway road, the rocky gorge is a haven for rare plants, as well as peregrine falcons and feral goats.

It is crossed by Brunel’s iconic suspension bridge, slung between the Georgian terraces of Clifton and the Forestry Commission’s Leigh Woods. From April, the woods will be the backdrop for an installation, called Withdrawn, by artist Luke Jerram. Part of the National Trust’s New Art Bristol project, Withdrawn will feature a series of ghostly fishing boats marooned in the forest, and aims to raise questions about climate change and its impact on our marine environment.

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